Lapis Lazuli

Lapis Lazuli has been used since at least 5000 BC.  It was one of the most favourite stones of the Egyptians;  it was thought to be sacred to the goddesses Nuit and to Maat.   Protective amulets and talismans were often carved into this precious stone, and it was powdered to make the colour ultramarine and used it as an eyeshadow,  and as paint or dye pigment. Its use as such would continue through the Renaissance, where it was favoured by Michelangelo. The Greeks called it ‘sapphire sprinkled with gold’.  Lapis lazuli was sacred to the Sumerian Goddess Ishtar, who is depicted wearing a necklace made of it.  Lapis Lazuli is also said to honour Athena, Hera, Inanna, Venus/Aphrodite and Dana/Danu.  In ancient Persia and pre-Columbian America, Lapis Lazuli was a symbol of the starry night, and a favorite stone of Islamic Asia for protection from the evil eye. In medieval Europe, it was believed to counteract the spirits of darkness and procure the aid of the spirits of light and wisdom.  Ancient Buddhists recommended Lapis as a stone to bring inner peace and freedom from negative thought, and during the Renaissance, Catherine the Great adorned an entire room in her palace with it. 
It is associated with the Throat and Third Eye Chakras, the Zodiac signs of Sagittarius and Taurus, the Element of Water and the Planets Neptune and Venus.
Lapis Lazuli has a long history of use in healing.  It is said to be helpful with troubles with the eyes, menstruation and difficult pregnancy, insomnia, blood and blood pressure, respiratory and nervous systems, throat, vocal chords, organs, bone marrow, thymus, ear and nasal passages, vertigo, inflammation, immune system, migraines, ADHD and depression.  
It is said to aid one in expressing themselves, achieving deep relaxation, harmony balance and peace.  Lapis lazuli has been used to aid meditation and achieve enlightenment through higher thought.  Finally, Lapis has also been used as stone of protection to guard against psychic or emotional attacks.

5 items

5 items